PGCPS LogoPrince George's County Public Schools
  • All parents and visitors must make an appointment to visit the school. Please call the main office to schedule an appointment.

  • About Our School

     13800 Brandywine Road
    Brandywine, MD 20613

    Phone: 301-372-0140
    Hours: 7:45am-2:25pm

    Dr. Melissa McGuire, Principal 
  • Students: Need Tech Help?

    Email: gwyph.techsupport@pgcps.org

  • GPHS Quicklinks


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  • Congressional App 1st Place Winner

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  • Announcements

    • GPHS Green School 2021!

      GPHS celebrates our 2021 Maryland Green School successes!  A virtual Youth Summit  celebrated the extraordinary ways they have kept up Green School efforts this year. Others recognized their hard work. Their team has worked with some very special people to create a recognition video especially for them! We hope you will enjoy and share with your students.

      Recognition Video

    • GPHS's Anthology of Creative Works

      Please enjoy GPHS literary anthology created by our Poetry Club and Literary Club.

      Dreaming in the Moonlight

    • GPHS REOPENING READINESS CHECKLIST
      > GPHS Reopening Checklist
    • PGCPS Parent Acknowledgement Covid-19 Letter
      >Parent Acknowledgement Letter Covid-19
    • Gwynn Park HS Newsletter
      <June
    • If you are interested in our CTE program please fill out this form
      CTE Interest Form
    • GPHS is on Social Media! Follow us on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook
      The link for our instagram is:
      The link for our twitter is:
      The link for our Facebook is:

       

    • Immunization Information
      >Immunization flyer
      >Immunization Recommendations 
      >Vaccine Requirements
    • Grade Appeal Procedure 2020
      >form
    • Regarding Service Learning Hours-Please Read

      Please read this message in its entirety regarding the student service hours (graduation requirement).


      SERVICE LEARNING HOURS:
      During this time of the COVID-19 pandemic, recommendations and restrictions change frequently and rapidly. Most critically, everyone needs to follow the State and national guidance and regulations issued to keep everyone safe. The Superintendent of the Maryland State Department of Education will issue any school policy changes. 

      As all of this unfolds, many young people and school systems are asking what they can, cannot, should, or should not be doing in relation to service-learning. Schools are closed, but many students either want to be helpful and support their communities during this pandemic, and/or want and/or need to earn service-learning hours towards fulfillment of the current service-learning graduation requirement.

      As physical distancing is required right now, the best option for young people looking for ways to be of service to others would be through indirect and advocacy service-learning projects they can engage in at home.

      News stories abound right now of creative, thoughtful young people taking the initiative collecting and assembling essential supplies for at risk populations (hygiene kits that include hand sanitizer, wipes, soap, etc. for people who are homeless; food baskets for people who are food insecure; activity kits for people who are homebound, etc.).

      Technology provides unique opportunities for students to reach out, support, and encourage people who are the most isolated. Nursing homes and care facilities have needed to stop all visitation in order to protect their residents who are most at risk from COVID-19. But technologies like ZOOM, Skype, Google Hangouts, WebEx, and FaceTime could allow youth to still interact with these populations who are feeling especially isolated. Students could arrange with facilities, using video conferencing technology, to perform music for residents, organize a sing-a-long, play games, hold a virtual prom, read together, and visit.

      There have been calls for community support in the creation of masks, gowns, and face shields that can be used by hospitals. Students who are interested and able with access to materials and equipment like sewing machines or 3D printers might decide to engage in those actions. Students could also participate remotely in long established activities with organizations like:

      Project Linus: https://www.projectlinus.org/volunteer/volunteer.php?StateKey=MD

      Casey Cares: https://www.caseycares.org/

      Kids Helping Hopkins: https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/johns-hopkins-childrens-center/ways-to-give/kids-helping-hopkins/

      Cool Kids Campaign: https://www.coolkidscampaign.org/

      The Ronald McDonald House: https://rmhcmaryland.org/

      Believe in Tomorrow: https://believeintomorrow.org/

      The Children’s Inn at NIH: https://childrensinn.org/

      Students could also engage in advocacy projects from home: emailing leaders advocating on issues on which students have conducted research and want to see policy changes; creating social media campaigns on various issues, including promoting critical COVID-19 safe behaviors such as the need to physically distance ourselves from one another. Keeping physical distance does not have to mean social isolation, and students can help the community understand ways to remain connected despite keeping physically apart. 

      High quality indirect and advocacy service-learning projects can be done from home as long as students work to meet Maryland’s Seven Best Practices of Service-Learning (http://marylandpublicschools.org/programs/Pages/Service-Learning/highqualitystandards.aspx). Students need to be encouraged as they research the issue they are working on to vet their sources of information.

      Please contact Ms. Brandon (amanda.brandon@pgcps.org) to share how you plan to complete your service hours for approval.
    • Fire Science Cadet Program
      View video>
      Women of the Fire Department>
    • SAT Parent Resources
    • School District Modification of Administrative Procedure 5113, Student Attendance-Important Please Read
      >view modification
    • Administrative Procedure 5121.3 Grading and Reporting for High Schools Grade Nine through Twelve
      Please review: Admin. Procedure 5121.3   Highlights of Admin. Procedure 5121.3.
    • Policy for Students Tardy to School and Class
      1st Offense and 2nd Offense - The main office will issue all late passes.
      3rd Offense - The teacher will allow the student to come to class late. The teacher will contact the parent.
      4th Offense - The student will be sent to class and administration will intervene (lunch duty, parent shadow, after school detention, etc.)
      5th Offense - In-school suspension  
    • Announcements from the Nurse

      The following forms are available:

    • Pest Management
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  • GPHS Event Calendar

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